Look at me now.

"

sometimes I kiss people I shouldn’t kiss and let them unbutton my jeans sometimes I leave English class without asking and walk in angular circles until I can hear the blood rushing under my skin sometimes I run until I can’t breathe sometimes I sit in the rain sometimes I sleep for six hours in the middle of the day

sometimes I drive too fast and listen to my music so loud that it hurts sometimes I drink until everything goes black and I don’t remember talking about you all night (even though I do)

sometimes I cry about books and about people who died hundreds of years ago sometimes I don’t cry even though I want to more than anything sometimes I ignore the people I love sometimes hold myself to keep everything in because you are not here to do it

sometimes I think I’m alive sometimes I think I probably never will be

"

- (via porn4smartgirls)

This is so raw and gritty and beautiful. (via gretaroseevans)

(via oh-nativetiger)

(Source: incoloure, via sounbreakable)

(Source: d5n1, via oh-nativetiger)

fuckyeahtattoos:

I always wanted to tattoo this maya angelou’s poem and I decided to get it done last week. I’ve a history with  ED, and this poem reminds me that matter what happens I’ll get through it and, as maya says, I’ll rise :)
Done by Adalto Franco - Gellys Tatto - SP, Brazil

fuckyeahtattoos:

I always wanted to tattoo this maya angelou’s poem and I decided to get it done last week. I’ve a history with  ED, and this poem reminds me that matter what happens I’ll get through it and, as maya says, I’ll rise :)

Done by Adalto Franco - Gellys Tatto - SP, Brazil

lacigreen:

skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.

damn.  looks like mother nature is coming for your sexist ass.

(via itstartswhenyourearound)

"Oh, God. It felt so good to make a decision for myself, without taking everyone else’s feelings into account. No, I’m doing this for me, and frankly, it’s about damn time."

- Nora Walker (Brothers and Sisters)

(Source: thehumbledtherapist, via fideliusecrets)

(Source: hbshizzle, via sounbreakable)

"At the moment, I’m suspended between where I am, where I’ve been, and where I am meant to be. I’m terrified that I’ll never find a way out."

- (175/365) by (DS)

(via intothegreatperhaps)